It’s time for the second instalment in this short fiction/sci-fi serial! Thank you so much to everyone who’s read and commented already ❀ As you know your feedback means a lot to me, and I really appreciate you taking the time to do it ❀

Today’s post is told from the view of a different lady than the one yesterday.Β It’s not necessary to have read Immortal 1 to read this one, but if you’re like me and like the whole picture I recommend you read it first πŸ™‚

The final instalment will follow tomorrow at the same time, so keep an eye out for it πŸ™‚

***

“How are you feeling today, Mrs. Parker?”

I kept my hands folded in my lap. Hospital rooms still made me uneasy, even though I should have been used to the sight and the sterile smells by now. Holding onto the locket which held the picture of my daughter helped. She was with me, even if she couldn’t be here in person to support me.

“I feel fine. I don’t feel any different to be honest.”

The doctor smiled. “That’s normal. The procedure is designed to leave as few side effects as possible. I do need to ask a few questions, however. Have you felt light headed or sick since we discharged you?”

I shook my head, wanting to get out more than having to talk to him. My daughter had sat through so many sessions like this one, and it had done her no good in the end. I felt fine. Wasn’t the whole point of this procedure, her procedure, that nothing would kill me?

I answered everything plain and short, hoping to get out and get on with things. Not that I had anything to get on with.

“Thank you, Mrs. Parker. Please be in touch if anything feels abnormal to you at all.”

“Of course.” I was familair with this whole process, and had been for months. It had only been a week since my brief procedure, but I had known all about it for longer than that.

My daughter had been the one who had worked on it, and who had nearly seen it through to the end. Just like her father she had died of a rare bone disease, a month before the cure had been completed. I was one of the first patients, after her final wish.

She had been a kind soul, just like her father. She knew I was suffering after first losing him and then losing her, too. I had no other children. They had been my world, and now that world was gone. I had considered alternatives for myself, but she must have known. She hadn’t wanted me to take that step.

A new view on life. That’s what she had wanted for me. I didn’t want to be in this world if it was without them, but how could I refuse her last request?

I had booked the Immortality Cure – thanks to my connections to her I had skipped the long waiting list – and now I was the very first human to be made immortal.

It hurt. My husband had been brave, and intelligent. He had worked at the labs for Life Corp., and she had inherited his intellect. Unlike him she had been directly employed by Life Corp., making the universe a better place one medical breakthrough at a time.

And that left me. Housewife. No talents to speak off. When I had been younger, before I had married George, I had wanted to travel the world. I had wanted to travel the universe and see the stars only three years ago, before my husband had died.

I sighed, tears blurring my view. My daughter had given me the chance to live a full life, doing whatever I wanted. Maybe I’d book a taxi to the edge of the universe. Apparently, the nebula over there was beautiful and glowing.

I had to start somewhere – the other side of the galaxy was as good a place to start as any.

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All writing belongs to the author, Sarina Langer.

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