Reviews

Good Omens

by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman

“According to the Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter – the world’s only totally reliable guide to the future – the world will end on a Saturday. Next Saturday, in fact. Just after tea…”

www-14092016-2What I thought:

I really wanted to love this, but for some reason we just didn’t click :/

So why am I reviewing it here – shelved away under Books I Love – anyway? Because I don’t know why I didn’t enjoy it. Good Omens has everything I want in a great book – humour, smooth writing, and the philosophy of good and evil. But let’s come to that in a moment.

“But you couldn’t tell that to demons like Hastur and Ligur. Fourteenth century minds, the lot of them. Spending years picking away at one soul. Admittedly it was craftsmanship, but you had to think differently these days. Not big, but wide. With five billion people in the world you couldn’t pick the bugger off one by one any more; you had to spread your effort. But demons like Ligur and Hastur wouldn’t understand. They’d never have thought up Welsh-language televison, for example. Or value added tax. Or Manchester.

He’d been particularly pleased with Manchester.”

One angel (Aziraphale) and one demon (Crowley) have one simple job – switch the antichrist with another baby at birth, so he can go home with a family who can raise him to be evil, and to love destruction and death and oceans of blood. After all, you can’t have the antichrist raised by a normal family, or he might not grow up right, God forbid! (if you’ll excuse the terrible pun) Only problem is, Aziraphale and Crowley switched the wrong baby, and the Antichrist (Adam) went home to a perfectly normal family. Turns out, it’s harder to start Armagaddon than you might think when you have no idea where the hell (… I couldn’t help myself) the antichrist is. Even worse: Adam isn’t a bad kid!

But the end of the world was foreseen by the powers that be – good as well as evil – and they’re really set on having this war, so the world begins to decline anyway. Atlantis appears in the middle of the ocean, new rainforests pop up over night, and the stones that make up Stonehenge rearrange themselves.

Oh, and, of course, Good Omens is full of madness, too.

So don’t let my not enjoying it sway you. Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman are gods, and my not enjoying it feels like blasphemy (someone stop me). There’s a very good chance that you’ll enjoy this trememdously (or at least a lot) should you give this a try! If you’re up for a bit/a lot of madness, and for having your ideas of good and evil questioned, then this is for you.

————————————-

Have you read Good Omens, or would you like to? Get some cookies, drop me a comment and let’s get this book club going!

I don’t review books professionally. These reviews are mainly a small summary and my opinion on books I’ve loved, they are not intended to be anything more. All ‘reviews’ include a picture, title and name of author linking to the book’s Goodreads listing, the blurb from the back of the book and my non-professional verdict.

For all other book reviews, please take a look here.

Advertisements